About robynmmoore

Anything to do with people and the environment and I'm interested! I've been writing and commenting about water and other community-related matters since 2006. In 2009, I finished a thesis on Kapiti's water issues and am still researching outcomes there. I am a compulsive researcher - my blog "On water" is a mix of research and opinion about what's going on with our water, from source to sea - it looks for the 'best' places & actions, as much as 'worst'. This website and the work I do as a trustee for the Whitireia Foundation are part of my aspiration to contribute to 'shaping more sustainable communities'...also the title of my thesis. Look it up - it's free at www.j.co.nz.

Wellington quake 6.6 – August 16

A large earthquake – magnitude 6.6 – struck central New Zealand today, August 16. The likelihood of a bigger shake is now elevated, following the severe earthquake felt around 2.31 pm.

Latest information from WREMO – 17 August 11 am:REGIONAL UPDATE #4 (FINAL): The Wellington Emergency Operations Centre has deactivated, but we will continue monitoring the situation throughout the weekend and will provide updates if there are any significant developments. Wellington CBD is open for business, however some areas may be cordoned off due to broken glass. Please respect cordons and exercise care.

An information centre for affected residents will be open at Wellington City Council, 101 Wakefield Street, from 10am – 4pm for the next few days. 

Aftershocks are continuing. Some buildings have sustained minor damage. Structural engineers are assessing buildings in the CBD today (Saturday), but there have been no reports of major structural damage so far.

Lukes Lane, closed after the earlier big quake, due to threat of a nine storey lift shaft structure collapsing, has been cordoned off again, with emergency demolition of the tower ordered.

Trains are running again. 

Please share this information with your network ‪#‎eqnz‪#‎wellingtonearthquake

16 August 4 pm – Advice to residents of affected areas: When you get home tonight, please ensure you check your grab-bags are easily accessible and you have fresh water, first-aid kit, warm clothing, toilet paper, rubbish bags, strong shoes and gloves, and if you have them – some hand sanitiser, latex gloves, and dust mask. A non-electric land-line phone would be good to dig out too if you have one. Keep the pressure off the phone lines if at all possible. Also, if you’re about to leave Wellington city, bear in mind the roads are pretty jam packed as everyone is having similar ideas. 

The quake was centred (as with the last severe one on July 21st) near Seddon in Marlborough, at a depth of 8km. The magnitude has been revised down (from 6.9) to 6.6, with the largest aftershock so far 5.7 (update – three sequential aftershocks around 5.30 pm have come in at 6.2 and at varying depths, with the shallowest occurring 25 km east of Picton 5 km deep). Trains are NOT running, and there are no bus replacements at this stage (4pm).

Check for WREMO (Wellington Regional Emergency Management Office) facebook updates.

Wellington CBD has stood up well, with no reports of injuries, although the shaking continues, and a number of buildings in the CBD are evacuating for safety reasons. 

No tsunami warning issued. Keep well clear of power lines and non-safety glass. Stay safe everyone. 

Notes from GNS

  • Look for and extinguish small fires. Fire is a common hazard after an earthquake.
  • Be aware of possible tsunamis if you live in coastal areas. When local authorities issue a tsunami warning, assume that a series of dangerous waves is on the way. Stay away from the beach.
  • Be careful when driving after an earthquake and anticipate traffic light outages.

If you are looking for some tips on how to help children deal with earthquakes and all the aftershocks – try this site: SKIP – Earthquakes and other scary stuff.

More information

Wellington earthquakes July 2013

This video shows a press conference convened by Mayor Celia Wade Brown, following the earthquakes that began shaking Wellington and Eastern Marlborough on Friday 19 July, just after 9 in the morning (centred in Seddon, near Blenheim). It provides a reasonable level of scientific detail,as well as discussing the state of buildings and the potential for further earthquakes, The first earthquake was felt at 09.07 on the 19th (see the GeoNet report for details), with the more severe and damaging quake (magnitude 6.5) occurring on Sunday 21 July at 17.09. There were no fatalities.

Much of Wellington’s CBD was off-limits while buildings were inspected and fallen masonry and glass were cleaned up. Power was lost in some areas, and all trains were halted until tracks could be checked.

Volunteer student army – A Wellington student volunteer army has formed, and anyone wanting help with cleaning up after the earthquakes in Wellington can contact them via their Facebook page: www.facebook.com/svawgtntwitter.com/WellingtonSVA or you can email wellington@sva.org.nz.

Alternatively, you can ask Council for help by phoning 04 499 4444.

Insurance – If your home, land or contents suffered damage in the recent earthquakes, you have three months to make a claim through the EQC (Earthquake Commission). Take photos, keep good records and make notes to help with your claim. If it’s safe to do so, hold onto damaged items until they can be inspected.

Call EQC on 0800 326 243 or go to their website http://www.eqc.govt.nz

Civil Defence  The Wellington Region Emergency Management Office (WREMO) posts up-to-date information on its website (www.getprepared.co.nz). Their Facebook page is worth a visit, especially if you have questions or are wanting to offer help.

The table summarises New Zealand’s earthquake numbers over the past week, month and year.

Magnitude Last week Last month Last year
< 2 308 591 4806
2 – 3 1350 1997 10957
3 – 4 389 541 2582
4 – 5 60 75 345
5 – 6 2 7 22
>= 6 1 1 3
Total 2110 3212 18715

http://www.geonet.org.nz/quakes/region/newzealand/statistics

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Map of the site of Christchurch's new urban village

Map of the site. Click to see the map enlarged (PDF).

The Breathe Urban Village Project is taking shape in Christchurch, with the announcement of four finalists and three highly commended concepts, chosen from fifty-eight entries from New Zealand and around the world.

The brief was to develop a concept for a new urban village that provides a variety of medium-density housing and lifestyle choices. Sustainability, innovation and a strong sense of community are key ingredients.

Three New Zealand entrants made the final cut, with the fourth coming from Italy. Judges are Kevin McCloud from TV’s UK Grand Designs, architect Stuart Gardyne, Development Specialist Martin Udale, Kevin Simcock (Engineer), Di Lucas (Landscape Architect), Huia Reriti (Ngāi Tahu Architect). Youth are represented on the judging panel by Zea Harman.

Now the finalists have three months to fine-tune their designs, before judges select the winning concept, which will take shape near Christchurch’s Latimer Square in the heart of the CBD.

The goal of the urban village project as it sits with the overarching Christchurch Central Recovery Plan is to offer an inner city village feel with exceptional quality of life, multi-use parks, entertainment facilities, and shopping, all right next to the central business area. The winning projects had to reflect innovation, international best practice and aspirations of all those that may live and around the development.

Take a look at the range of designs, they’re inspiring.

Breathe urban village design competition Christchurch

Click on the image to see details of the Breathe Project and all the entries.

Source for this article: http://www.futurechristchurch.co.nz/breathe

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Canterbury people mark the second anniversary of the February 2011 earthquake today, with a midday service and other community events getting underway in Latimer Square. This area of the central business district was devastated by the 6.3-magnitude quake on 22 February 2011. Nearby, the Canterbury Television building (CTV) collapse resulted in the greatest single loss of life during the quake.

The civic service, which is co-hosted by Christchurch Cathedral, includes the laying of a wreath, readings and a minute’s silence at 12.51 pm, recalling the moment when the earthquake occurred.

The River of Flowers is expected to be a spectacular community event, with people invited to drop flowers into the Avon and Heathcote rivers and the estuary all through the day until 8 pm. People can leave messages on one of a number of Trees of Hope around the city and at the  Gap Filler-hosted space at the Pallet Pavilion near Victoria Square. Gap Filler’s aim is to bring people together to remember what has happened, but also to look towards the future and celebrate our resilience. No speeches, just cake, music and communityIn the evening, all the tables will be put together to form one long table to encourage people to come together on this day in the spirit of community. 

Speaking this morning on Radio New Zealand National, Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Minister Gerry Brownlee remains upbeat about Canterbury’s future, two years after the destruction which left thousands of homes and businesses in ruins, and 185 dead. The Minister said that despite widespread concern that there would be unemployment and economic decline in the aftermath of the earthquake, ‘none of that has come to fruition’ (Radio New Zealand Morning Report, 22 Feb 2013). He suggested that Canterbury was in fact, leading New Zealand’s economic recovery, with 16,000 jobs created in Canterbury in the past 12 months.

This short video is a raw (but we think, not insensitive) look at the destruction left by the earthquake event two years ago today. It was shot by Logan McMillan and begins 1 minute after the earthquake struck.

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New proposals on earthquake-prone buildings are up for public consultation, with submissions due by 8th March, 2013. The Department of Building and Housing have created a short video to throw some light on the issues raised by the Canterbury earthquakes of 2010 and 2011. The current earthquake-prone buildings system is described, along with the proposed changes and the reasons for them.

Wellingtonians are invited to a briefing tomorrow to discuss the proposed changes. The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, along with Wellington City Council, have organised the February 5 meeting in the Michael Fowler Centre.

The changes would mean that:

  • All commercial and multi-storey buildings must have a seismic capacity assessment within five years.
  • Owners of buildings assessed as earthquake-prone would then have up to 10 years to strengthen or demolish them.

The changes imply greater central government control over seismic issues, standards and assessments, than currently.

The vast majority of residential buildings are exempt from the earthquake-prone buildings system and views are sought on the Royal Commission’s recommendation to allow local authorities the power, on consultation with their communities, to enforce policies that would require certain hazardous elements on residential buildings to be dealt with in a specified time. Some elements of residential buildings, like unreinforced masonry chimneys, pose serious hazards in earthquakes. The Commission contends that local authorities should have power to manage this risk, in the context of their region’s seismic profile and the nature of their housing stock .

Make an online submission at dbh.govt.nz, where you can view the consultation document and explanatory video.

Check out The Royal Commission’s report covering earthquake-prone building policy http://canterbury.royalcommission.govt.nz/Final-Report—Part-Two (Volume 4). This was released on 7 December 2012. Note there are some key points of difference in the Royal Commission recommendations, compared with the MBIE review:

  • Residential buildings – individual local authorities to be able to require strengthening of hazardous elements in residential buildings (most residential buildings are not currently covered by the earthquake-prone building system).
  • Unreinforced masonry buildings – faster timeframes for assessment (within two years) and strengthening (within seven years). Higher strengthening levels (to 50 per cent of new building requirements) for certain parts of unreinforced masonry buildings (chimneys, parapets, ornaments and external walls).
  • Local authority powers – giving local authorities the option of requiring strengthening to be done faster and/or to higher levels than those set by central government, after consulting with communities.

Wellington public meeting, February 5, 7pm, the Michael Fowler Centre. 

Public consultation on the Government’s proposed changes closes on March 8, 2013.

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ShakeOut is happening at 9.26 am on September 26 this year.

What is ShakeOut? It’s a Ministry of Civil Defence initiative to draw everyone’s attention to earthquake preparedness. Right now, we have more than one million people registered to take part!

Are you registered for this NZ-wide earthquake drill? Further information is available on the Civil Defence website: http://www.getthru.govt.nz/web/GetThru.nsf

By registering for the ShakeOut, you will:

  • Be part of the largest-ever earthquake drill in New Zealand!
  • Help motivate others to Get Ready and Get Thru
  • Make sure you, your family and your co-workers know what to do when the next earthquake happens.

Essential details
• Date and time: Wednesday 26 September at 9.26 am
• Drill starts: 9.26am with air-horn blast, school bell ringing, radio siren (hear it here) or  whatever arranged (please, no fire alarms)
• Action to take: DROP, COVER and HOLD
• Drill ends: Air-horns or other agreed signal means the exercise is over.

Groups may wish to discuss potential further action, had this been a real event and not a drill. You can download an observer form and a post-drill workplace discussion sheet (PDF) from the Get Thru site, which might be useful for reflecting on what went well and what didn’t.

Thanks for getting on board 🙂

What would you do in a real earthquake? Here’s the Civil Defence advice:

Drop to the ground

Cover by getting under a sturdy desk or table

Hold on to it until the shaking stops.

  • If you are indoors, stay there until the shaking stops and you are sure it is safe to go outside.
  • If you are outdoors, find a clear spot away from buildings, trees, streetlights and power lines, then drop, cover and hold. Stay there until the shaking stops.
  • If you are driving, pull over to a clear location, stop and stay there with your seatbelt fastened until the shaking stops. Drive carefully and avoid bridges or ramps that might have been damaged.
  • If you are within a tsunami zone on the coast, then move inland or to higher ground as soon as possible.

Video

Kids know best video via Get Thru

A classroom of kiwi kids answer the question ‘what is an earthquake?’ then they show us how to DROP – COVER – HOLD

NZ Get Thru – kids know best YouTube

Related articles

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100 day blueprint for Christchurch Central (Boffa Miskell, July 2012)

Christchurch Central Recovery Plan

Achievable, full of potential, and ready to fly. The 100 day spatial blueprint for Christchurch’s recovery is out only three days past its ambitious due date. The blueprint, developed by NZ urban design specialists Boffa Miskell, describes a more compact, low-rise central city – a city of precincts, with strong connections to green spaces and to the river that runs through it. The blueprint envisions ‘a well-formed and vibrant city centre that produces economic and social benefits by bringing people together for business, cultural or social activities’.

About 840 properties are to be bought from owners by the government, so that key facilities can go where they are needed. The old Turners & Growers site, on the edge of the CBD’s eastern precincts has been chosen for a new a covered stadium to replace the earthquake-damaged AMI Stadium. It will seat 35,000 people. A 2000 seat convention centre is also part of the plan, as is increasing the density of dwellings in the inner heart of the CBD, to accommodate 20,000 people. A massive children’s play park will be one of the riverside amenities expected to be fast-tracked to draw people back into the heart of Christchurch. The plan has been founded on a set of goals:

See the blueprint at http://static.stuff.co.nz/files/christchurch-central-recovery-plan.pdf

A Vision for Christchurch Central Recovery

  • greater productivity
  • connectedness
  • development of human capital
  • sharing of ideas and
  • a shared identity
  • reflecting heritage

5.5 billion dollars has been set aside by government for implementing the Christchurch recovery plan, which Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Minister, Gerry Brownlee says, will set it apart from any other urban centre. Seventy per cent of buildings in Christchurch’s centre have been under demolition in the wake of the 2010 and 2011 earthquakes, with 80 percent of them insured. Insurers have an obligation to pay to reinstate what was damaged, and there may be a gap between what is paid out, and the actual cost of rebuilding. However, there is reason to be optimistic regarding the affordability of the blue print, and the potential for investor capital to flow back into the city, suggests Chamber of Commerce CEO, Peter Townsend. It is just a plan. We have to make it work, and we will, he told Radio NZ National.

Christchurch Central Development Unit director Warwick Isaccs called the blueprint ‘bold and innovative’. He said that the blueprint was important to lift the confidence of investors, as much as residents. While the stadium might take ten years to complete, Mr Isaccs suggested that within three years, people could expect to see good progress on the proposed river park and the ‘green frame’ around the city. Integrating the river into the fabric of the city will be at the top of the list, Mr Townsend  indicated.

Christchurch Central Recovery Plan - lower buildings will become a defining feature of the central city

Lower buildings will become a defining feature of the central city in the medium term

Christchurch Central Recovery Plan - The Frame